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Monday, November 24, 2008
Take a minute now to call or e-mail an out-of-town friend or family member to ask him or her to be your family’s designated contact in the event of an emergency. This person be located far enough away so that they are unlikely to be impacted by your local disaster or emergency. Be sure to share the contact's phone number with everyone in the family. During an emergency, you can call your contact who can share with other family members where you are; how you are doing; and how to get in contact with you.

Prepardness tip adapted from the Department of Homeland Security: http://www.dhs.gov/xcitizens/editorial_0711.shtm

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Your child's school will have an emergency plan. Get a copy of this by requesting a copy at the school office, or checking out the school's website. Keep a copy at home and work or other places where you spend a lot of your time. Incorporate the school's plan into your family’s emergency plan. Also, learn about the disaster plans at your workplace or other places where you and your family spend time.

Prepardness tip adapted from the Department of Homeland Security: http://www.dhs.gov/xcitizens/editorial_0711.shtm

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Meet with your family, loved ones or neighbors and pick a place to meet after a disaster. It's best to designate two meeting places. The first place should be right outside your home, in case of a sudden home emergency, such as a fire. The second place you choose should be outside your neighborhood, (or immediate area) in the event that it is not safe to stay nearby.

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Sunday, November 23, 2008
Take a quick moment to imagine that there is an emergency (such as a fire) in your home, and you need to leave quickly. What are the best escape routes from your home? Find at least two ways out of each room. If you have a 2-story house, consider getting a Fire Escape Ladder so you can evacuate safely. Write down the escape routes, and review this with your family on a regular basis.


For more quick tips, visit iPrepare.com.

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Friday, November 21, 2008
You should store enough supplies in your home to meet the needs of you and your family for at least three days. Assemble an emergency kit to take with you in an evacuation. Be sure to include food, water, solar or battery-powered radio and flashlight with extra batteries, first aid supplies, change of clothing, blanket or sleeping bag, wrench or pliers, whistle, dust mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape, trash bags, map, a manual can opener for canned food and special items for infants, elderly, the sick or people with disabilities. Keep these items in an easy to carry container such as a covered trash container, a large backpack, or a duffle bag.


You can also assemble your kit using our "Build-a-Kit" tool.

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The easiest way to begin your emergency preparedness program is one step at a time. The amount of information and decisions to make can be overwhelming. So, we will start by sharing with you some short and simple preparedness tips.

1. Take a moment to think about the types of emergencies or disasters that are most likely to impact you. Do you live in a flood zone? Are you at risk for hurricanes? Do you live near a fault line where you could be affected by an earthquake? Fires can impact anyone, anywhere.

Once you have identified a type of disaster, perform a google search on this topic to gather as much relevant information as possible. Also, contact your local fire department to learn the types of preparations they recommend.

In future articles, we will be sharing more preparedness tips - simple step-by-step things you can do to help you become more prepared. One great resource is the Department of Homeland Security's "30 Tips for Emergency Preparedness." You can find a wealth of information at iPrepare.com, or on other sites throughout the web. Our Disaster Preparedness Guide also includes detailed information that is specific to various types of disasters.

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